10 Reasons Your Employees Leave

By |2018-03-06T17:18:44+00:00February 13th, 2013|Categories: Advice|Tags: |

People change jobs regularly, and for many different reasons. Better job offers, relocation and ‘just trying something new’ are all valid reasons for an employee to hand in their notice. But what about the ‘negative’ reasons that cause employees to leave? These are the reasons that could be prevented and should inspire change within your business to reduce or eliminate others leaving under the same circumstances.

#1 Failure to utilise employee’s interests and passions

Tapping into your individual employees personal interests, and encouraging them to use their passion to benefit your business will maintain their interest and inspire them to think ‘outside of the box’. If you understand what motivates your employees, you have a way to encourage them to achieve results by doing something they enjoy.

#2 Failure to encourage and facilitate employee development

Ensuring that your employee’s have, understand and are aware of their development program is key to employee engagement and wellbeing. If your employees are not learning and developing, then they may look elsewhere for an employer who will invest in their development. Conducting regular meetings to discuss and agree an employee’s development requirements will improve relationships between the manager and the employee.

#3 Failure to challenge

Everyone likes a challenge. Thinking creatively to achieve a solution and working towards resolving an issue maintain interest and inspire employees to learn new things. A lack of challenge at work will lead to boredom and the desire to find that challenge elsewhere.

#4 Failure to appreciate who they are and what they do

Research shows that people leave their jobs because of a lack of appreciation, not compensation. Find ways to reward employee’s for good work and give praise where it is due.

#5 Failure to offer career advancement

Lack of promotion, or even a chance of promotion, will stifle your employee’s motivation. A clear career progression plan is an important tool in maintaining employee engagement and motivation, particularly when it comes to dealing with the younger generation.

#6 Failure to accept what is, and what isn’t, possible

Overloading your employees with work, and not allowing them enough time to complete assigned tasks is bad management. Feeling pressured to work long hours at the expense of a personal life makes many people question whether they are working for the right company, and whether their work/life balance could be better elsewhere.

#7 Failure to offer financial stability

Failing to offer employees financial stability not only causes stress in the workplace, but also damages your relationship with the workforce. People like and need to feel secure in their job in order to be productive and motivated.

#8 Failure to offer a nice working environment

As detailed in a previous article, a pleasant working environment is very important for employee wellbeing and productivity. Feeling uncomfortable or bored at work will lead to employees seeking an alternative that is more interesting and inspiring.

#9 Failure to listen to your employees

If your employees are raising concerns or highlighting issues that should be addressed, ignoring them will only make matters worse. If your workforce knows that when they go to their manager with a problem, they will be listened to and the appropriate action taken, they will feel happier in their role and with their manager.

#10 Failure to lead

Failing to be seen as a leader by assuming responsibility for your subordinates and leading by example will encourage your employees to think about (and discuss) where the direction is in the company. According to research conducted by the Gallup organization, “employees do not leave their jobs due to company performance; they leave because of their bosses”.

Credit: Bolt Insurance